Scientists snare their first ever observations of a solar wave erupting upward from a sunspot

Solar scientists have a problem: They haven’t been able to fully explain why the Sun’s atmosphere is about 100 times hotter than its surface.

Now, observations of a solar wave rising up from a sunspot may help explain at least one of the ways in which the atmosphere, called the corona, gets so hot.

Why should the Sun’s atmosphere be hotter than the region below it? If you think about it, this makes no sense.

Nuclear fusion in the center of the Sun heats this region to an astounding 27 million degrees F. Each successive layer of the sun is cooler than the one below it. In fact, the Sun’s surface is a relatively brisk 10,800 degrees F.

If you’ve ever sat next to a campfire and had to move away a bit because it was too hot, this should make perfect sense.

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